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  • On August 28, Sonoma County held its first wildfire recovery meeting entirely in Spanish – nearly 11 months after the October fires began. About a hundred people showed up at Lawrence Cook Middle School in Roseland to meet with county officials. Reporter Adia White was there and has more on residents’ 26098016447 de5cb9d600 oThe Larkfield neighborhood in Santa Rosa was devastated by the Tubbs Fire. Many Spanish speakers were affected by rising rents after thousands were displaced during the October fires. Photo Credit: Lars Plougmanntop concerns.

    This report was supported by a grant from Internews.

     

  • On August 28, Sonoma County held its first wildfire recovery meeting entirely in Spanish – nearly 11 months after the October fires began. About a hundred people showed up at Lawrence Cook Middle School in Roseland to meet with county officials. Reporter Adia White was there and has more on residents’ 26098016447 de5cb9d600 oThe Larkfield neighborhood in Santa Rosa was devastated by the Tubbs Fire. Many Spanish speakers were affected by rising rents after thousands were displaced during the October fires. Photo Credit: Lars Plougmanntop concerns.

    This report was supported by a grant from Internews.

     

  • The National Weather Service in Sacramento has issued a Red Flag Warning, which is in effect from 11:000 am Friday to 11:00 pm PDT Saturday.

    The Fire Weather Watch is no longer in effect. A Red Flag Warning means that critical fire weather conditions are either occurring now, or will shortly. A combination of strong winds, low relative humidity, and warm temperatures can contribute to extreme fire behavior.

    The highest threat is near the Mendocino Complex burn areas, with winds on Saturday expected from the west to southwest. Local gusts up to 30 mph possible along ridge tops. Afternoon humidity levels will be around 15 to 20 percent, with overnight/early morning levels around to 30 to 40 percent.

    These conditions can result in dangerous and rapid irregular spreading of large wildfires. 

    Original Source

  • Dinner served by Bedouin elder sizedLocal activist Linda Sartor is giving a slide presentation September 27 about her recent stay on the West Bank.
     
    She visited the Middle East as a witness for peace; it reinforced her feeling that life in the Palestinian territories is difficult and unfair.
     
     
    (Photos:
     
    1. Linda Sartor and her team of observers visit the tent of a Bedouin elder and are served dinner.
     
    2. Sartor observes a tense situation between Israeli troops and Palestinians.
     
    3. Sartor says these cars belonging to Palestinians were burned by Israeli settlers.)
     
    See "Linda's Month in Palestine" at the Peace and Justice Center in Santa Rosa. Come at 6:30 pm, the presentation begins at 7:00.
    Observing Soldiers confronting Palestinians sized
     
    Palestinian cars burnt by settlers in the night sized
  • • To fully repeal Obama-era car emissions standards, the Trump administration first must strip California of a long-held right.

    • With large leads in both polls and fundraising, Democrat Gavin Newsom is signaling that he’ll only hold one general election debate against Republican John Cox in the California governor’s race.

    Friday, August 3, 2018

    Today' reporting by Ben Bradford and Ben Adler.

    Original Source

  • • Governor Brown advocates for limiting power companies’ liability when their equipment causes the fires.

     

    • Women’s health groups in California say expecting mothers with low-risk pregnancies should think twice before opting for a caesarean section.

    Thursday, August 2, 2018

    Today's reporting by Ben Bradford and Sammy Caiola.

    Original Source

  • • Fire crews are having some success keeping the Carr Fire from returning to the city of Redding.

     

    • As California lawmakers and Gov. Jerry Brown debate who should pay for the billions of dollars in wildfire damages striking the state, Californians might wonder how much government help is available to rebuild their homes. The answer? Not much.

    Tuesday, July 31, 2018

    Today's reporting by April Ehrlich (Jefferson Public Radio) and Ben Adler.

    Original Source

  • • Following nine years of research, the state's water board has proposed to increase water flows in the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary.

    The board says this will prevent an ecological crisis including the total collapse of fisheries.

    Today's reporting by Nadine Sebai and Ezra David Romero.

    • More than half a million heavy-duty trucks made by Cummins will be recalled nationwide due to excessive emissions

    Wednesday, August 1, 2018

    Today's reporting by Nadine Sebai and Ezra David Romero.

    Original Source

  • cannabis nugs weedporndailyDavid Downs, California editor for Leafly.com, joins us this month for another cannabis commentary. With the Sonoma County harvest in full swing, disrupted somewhat by early rains, Downs looks at the current state of the marijuana business. His commentary is below.
     
     
    Can you smell it in the air? It’s cannabis harvest season in North America.
     
    (Photo: Cannabis "nugs" courtesy of Weed Porn Daily)
     
    Americans consume an estimated six thousand metric tons of marijuana each year, much of it harvested in October. This year cannabis gardening is legal for adults 21 and over in California and the harvest promises to be one for the record books. A much bigger bumper crop of commercial cannabis will hit store shelves this fall, but only after it runs an unprecedented, new gauntlet of safety tests.
     
    Today’s legal weed is being tracked and analyzed like never before, as a new approach to battling the entrenched black market for this wildly successful plant.
     
    For starters, regulators hope to lure consumers away from the illicit market and into adult-use stores with cannabis certified free of pesticides, mold, fungus and other contaminants.
     
    Since July 1, “phase two” testing regulations have clamped down on impurities in the supply chain. Some 20 percent of all batches submitted to labs in the state failed tests that measured potency and purity, regulators reported in September.
     
    One problem has been pesticides. About 400 batches out of 11,000 in the state failed for pesticides like myclobutanil, which creates toxic fumes – including hydrogen cyanide — when heated.
     
    Cannabis farmers bringing crops to market this fall face tough, near-organic standards for pesticides like this and other contaminants. So they’re using organic, state-approved remedies.
     
    Ladybugs and praying mantises feed on cannabis pests like aphids.
     
    State officials deem certain types of bacteria, or certain plant oils like neem oil kosher. On the line is a multi-billion dollar crop that can be ravaged by powdery mold, mildew, caterpillars and mites, and a fungus called botrytis – which also attacks wine grapes.
     
    Never has a crop so valuable become so tracked. The plants harvested this fall will be the last to go without a mandatory ‘track and trace’ tag on their stems. This winter, the state will put every commercial cannabis plant into a database run by a vendor called METRC. All plants bigger than 12 inches must get tagged and tracked in a system designed to prevent leakage into the black market.
     
    So far track and trace’s record has been spotty. METRC has failed or suffered data breaches in other states. Oregon is tracking and tracing its cannabis, but few regulators are assigned to follow the results.
     
    Meanwhile, this harvest season, federal authorities remain focused on large-scale interstate traffickers, of which there are still many.
     
    An estimated four out of the five pounds of cannabis grown in California gets smoked in Chicago, Atlanta, New York and other states. So high is the demand for what amounts to a $40 billion crop that “trespass grows” continue to bloom on public and private wildlands.
     
    Despite 80 years of prohibition, millions of people arrested, tens of billions of dollars spent, cannabis grows from the tip of Maine to the beaches of San Diego.
     
    That is an astonishing rise for one humble hemp seed, which first came over with Columbus some 500 or so years ago.
     
    All of which is to say — don’t let anyone tell you prohibition could eradicate cannabis from North America. You might as well declare a war on tumbleweeds. The best we may hope for is an uneasy truce. And peace in the fragrant fields, once and for all.
     
    This is David Downs, California Editor for Leafly, with this Cannabis Commentary.
  • KBBF Bilingual Public Radio and KRCB FM Radio 91, an NPR member station, have collaborated on a project looking at the health of people in the Roseland community of Santa Rosa. The goal was to see if the annexation of Roseland on November 1, 2017 would result in any improvement in the health of people in the community.

    We first assembled nonprofits active in the neighborhood to help educate us about the issues. We also set up a table at the opening of Andy’s Unity Park, as well as asking customers at a Roseland grocery store what issues concerned them, and how we could tell stories to bring their concerns forward to city and county officials and others.

    The resulting stories had two venues: KBBF’s Informes talk show featured Roseland health as its subject six times. Those programs were in Spanish, but you can read English summaries on the web for each show.

    We also produced news stories that ran on KRCB in English, during the national news programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. (see links to those stories at right, or below by clicking "Listen."
     
    Some news stories were translated into Spanish for KBBF’s audience. (Coming soon)

    As the project flowered, we shared our stories with our original group of nonprofit partners, as well as city and county elected officials. We’re eager to see if our concerns will result in increased attention to some of the most critical issues, like housing, nutrition, infrastructure improvements and the continued toll of uncertainty in the community regarding immigration enforcement.

    If you’ve got thoughts about how this project can increase its impact, please write to us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

    This project supported by a grant from the USC-Annenberg Center for Health Journalism Impact Fund.
  • life jackets on the Russian RiverEven in summer, the calm surface of the Russian River masks hidden hazards.
     
    This summer, the county parks department has expanded its River Patrol safety program to boost swimmer safety at several popular beaches along the River's lower reach.
     
    Independent producer Bruce Robinson reports.
     
     
     
    Here's more information from Sonoma County Regional Parks.
     
    (photo: Free life jackets await swimmers at Steelhead Beach Regional Park in Forestville. Credit: Bruce Robinson)
  • On Friday, August 3, 2018, the final active shooter training exercise will take place at Piner High School in Santa Rosa starting at 8:30am and ending at approximately 5:00pm.

    “This training has proven to be invaluable and has greatly prepared all of us for an active shooter incident,” explains SRPD Sergeant Robert Reynolds. “The police department, fire department and our EMS partners will continue to work together in the future. A special thank you to the Santa Rosa City Schools for their support and allowing us to use Piner High School as the training site.”

    This joint drill will include the response from the same local emergency service agencies and educational institutions as the previous trainings and includes: Santa Rosa Police Department (SRPD), City of Santa Rosa Fire Department (SRFD), American Medical Response (AMR), Santa Rosa Junior College District Police Department, California Highway Patrol (CHP) and Santa Rosa City Schools.

    Piner High School will be off-limits to anyone not participating in the training exercise, and the perimeter of the school will be cordoned off. The exercise is not anticipated to impact traffic on Fulton Road.

    Residents and motorists may notice a large amount of law enforcement and emergency vehicles during the exercise, which may include ambulances, fire engines, and police cars. Those in the surrounding area may also hear sounds of screaming, simulated gun fire, simulated explosions, and other noises as part of the training.

    Original Source

  • dale mensing humboldt independentPerhaps the third time will be the charm for candidate Dale Mensing, running for the House seat in California's 2nd Congressional District. He faced Representative Jared Huffman in 2014 and 2016 and lost. He's on the ballot again, having placed second in the primary. 
     
    Mensing is a supermarket checker and bagger at the Smart Food Warehouse in Redway, Calif. near Garberville. He's a strong supporter of Donald Trump, and shares many of the president's ideas. A believer in the Second Amendment, he feels that politicians are insufficiently dedicated to the Bill of Rights and the Constitution.
     
    He talked with News Director Steve Mencher.
     
     
     (Photo courtesy of the Humboldt Independent)
     
     
  • Kavanaugh testimony1Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and the woman who has accused him of sexually assaulting her in high school, Christine Blasey Ford, are testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Watch the proceeding live.
  • We've added a new, full-time reporter to the news department here at KRCB.

    Adia White comes to us from Chico, where she's covered local news, including California's deadly and unpredictable fires.

    She tells us about what she'll be keeping an eye on in the coming months, in conversation with KRCB news director Steve Mencher.

    Original Source

  • Containment lines are growing around the Mendocino Complex Fires, but thousands of homes are still threatened.

    Firefighters are concerned because a red flag warning is in effect over part of the weekend.

    Reporter Adia White spoke with Cal Fire's Public Information Officer Tricia Austin for an update.

    Keep an eye on local fires with the San Francisco Chronicle's interactive fire tracker.

    Original Source

  • Containment lines are growing around the Mendocino Complex Fires, but thousands of homes are still threatened.

    Firefighters are concerned because a red flag warning is in effect over part of the weekend.

    Reporter Adia White spoke with Cal Fire's Public Information Officer Tricia Austin for an update.

    Keep an eye on local fires with the San Francisco Chronicle's interactive fire tracker.

    Original Source

  •  
  • The Mendocino Complex fires have consumed 110,166 acres and destroyed a combined 14 residences and 24 outbuildings.

    12,200 structures remain under threat. The larger of the two fires, the Ranch Fire, is burning northeast of Ukiah and is 33 percent contained. The River Fire is burning near Hopland is 50 percent contained.

    As of 9:00 am Thursday, The Lake County Sheriff’s Office issued a Mandatory Evacuation in Western Lake County. The Mandatory Evacuation area is west of Lucerne at Bartlett Springs Road and Highway CA-20, south of the fire, east of the fire, north of Clear Lake including the communities of Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Nice, Lakeport, Witter Springs, Bachelor Valley, Scotts Valley, Saratoga Springs.

    “For most of the night, both fires remained active in the upper elevations. The ridgetops reached peak relative humidity around midnight and then began to drop. The valleys and drainage's remained far less active and the fire was not as active in the unexposed areas. Firing operations on both fires took well and increased containment line. The fire continues to spread into the Mendocino National Forest and crews are scouting for opportunities ahead of the active fire's edge. Fire crews are fighting the fire aggressively. Very steep terrain and fire intensity on the fire front make it difficult to insert crews in certain areas of the fire.”

    To sign up to receive news releases and fact sheets for the Mendocino Complex click the link.

    Original Source

  • The Mendocino Complex fires have consumed 110,166 acres and destroyed a combined 14 residences and 24 outbuildings.

    12,200 structures remain under threat. The larger of the two fires, the Ranch Fire, is burning northeast of Ukiah and is 33 percent contained. The River Fire is burning near Hopland is 50 percent contained.

    As of 9:00 am Thursday, The Lake County Sheriff’s Office issued a Mandatory Evacuation in Western Lake County. The Mandatory Evacuation area is west of Lucerne at Bartlett Springs Road and Highway CA-20, south of the fire, east of the fire, north of Clear Lake including the communities of Blue Lakes, Upper Lake, Nice, Lakeport, Witter Springs, Bachelor Valley, Scotts Valley, Saratoga Springs.

    “For most of the night, both fires remained active in the upper elevations. The ridgetops reached peak relative humidity around midnight and then began to drop. The valleys and drainage's remained far less active and the fire was not as active in the unexposed areas. Firing operations on both fires took well and increased containment line. The fire continues to spread into the Mendocino National Forest and crews are scouting for opportunities ahead of the active fire's edge. Fire crews are fighting the fire aggressively. Very steep terrain and fire intensity on the fire front make it difficult to insert crews in certain areas of the fire.”

    To sign up to receive news releases and fact sheets for the Mendocino Complex click the link.

    Original Source

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  • Jared HuffmanRep. Jared Huffman has represented California's 2nd District since 2013. The district stretches from San Francisco to the Oregon border along the coast, and inland in some places. He's been leading the opposition to President Trump, and has even begun to explore impeachment options, should Democrats win back control of the House.
     
    He spoke with KRCB News Director Steve Mencher
     
  • On average, residents of Southwest Santa Rosa have poorer health outcomes than their neighbors in more affluent sections of the city. According to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat, a 2014 report published by the Sonoma County Department of Health Services, found that Roseland had a lower human development index than the state of Mississippi, which is ranked lowest in the nation. Human development indices are based on a number of factors including health, income and education.

    As part of our continuing coverage of health in Roseland, KRCB’s Adia White attended a class called “Cultivating for Health” at Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens. She has more on Maria de los AngelesMaria de los Angeles Quiñones stands in the medicinal herb garden at Bayer Farms. Photo Credit: Adia Whitehow this group is taking control of their health by growing, preparing and using medicinal plants.

    This report is part of our ongoing partnership with radio station KBBF. It is supported by a grant from the USC-Annenberg Center for Health Journalism Impact Fund.


     

    Escucha en Español/Listen in Spanish

    En promedio, los residentes del suroeste de Santa Rosa tienen peores resultados de salud que sus vecinos en las secciones más prósperas de la ciudad.
     
    De acuerdo con Santa Rosa Press Democrat, un informe de 2014 publicado por el Departamento de Servicios de Salud del Condado de Sonoma, encontró que Roseland tenía un índice de desarrollo humano más bajo que el estado de Mississippi, que ocupa el puesto más bajo en la nación.
     
    Los índices de desarrollo humano se basan en una serie de factores que incluyen la salud, los ingresos y la educación.
    Como parte de nuestra cobertura continua de salud en Roseland, Adia White de KRCB asistió a una clase llamada "Cultivación para La Salud" en Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens. Ella tiene más información sobre cómo este grupo toma el control de su salud mediante el cultivo, la preparación y el uso de plantas medicinales.
     
    Este informe es parte de nuestra asociación continua con la estación de radio KBBF. Cuenta con el apoyo de una subvención del Fondo de Impacto del Centro de USC-Annenberg para Periodismo de Salud.
     
    (María de los Ángeles Quiñones se encuentra en el jardín de hierbas medicinales en Bayer Farms. Crédito de foto: Adia White)
  • Efforts to put a rent control initiative on the November ballot have fallen short in Santa Rosa.

    Organizers did not gather a sufficient number of signatures from registered voters. Rent control was one of many subjects at a recent meeting of the Alliance for a Just, Equitable and Sustainable Recovery.

    Reporter Adia White tells us more about the hopes of several speakers at the event, who believed that rent control might have helped residents who struggle to stay in the area after the recent wildfires.

    Original Source

  • The fibrous hemp plant a botanical cousin of cannabis  has long been used for making paper, textiles, ropes and many other products. In combination with hydraulic lime, chipped hemp stalks are also being made into an intriguing building material known as "hempcrete."  A small building site southwest of Sebastopol is the region's first experiment in using the modern version of this ancient building material.  Reporter Bruce Robinson has the inside story. Sheldon houseArchitect Steve Sheldon stands in front of his hempcrete building project. Credit: Bruce Robinson

  • Sonoma County tested the Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) system in five areas of the county on Wednesday Sept. 12. Wireless alerts are sent out as text messages to all mobile phones in a selected area.

    The areas involved in Wednesday’s test were Guerneville, Penngrove, Glen Ellen, Healdsburg, and Roseland. James Gore, chair of Sonoma County’s Board of Supervisors, spoke about the preliminary results of the test at a press conference on Wednesday, “The systems went out, they all worked. But, there was significant spillover we can see already; where we targeted a specific area, for instance in Sonoma valley, and people got notifications in Petaluma, Rohnert Park and other areas.”

    Meanwhile some who should have received the test alert did not. Lynda Hopkins represents district five on the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors. At Wednesday’s press conference she said her constituents from Guerneville reported that they did not receive any mobile alert.  

    According to the Sonoma County Emergency Operations Center, this was the first Wireless Emergency Alert test of this scale on the west coast. You can watch the press conference about the test on Sonoma County's Facebook page

    Sonoma County is asking residents to take a survey to evaluate the alert. The survey is available online at https://socoemergency.org/.


     

    Emergency Alarm Light Ambulance Security Siren 959592The Wireless Emergency Alert test took place in five areas of Sonoma County. Credit: Max Pixel

  • After the devastating October wildfires, communities across the North Bay are grappling with how to rebuild in a way that is fair, just and efficient.

      Several community organizations, working under the umbrella of the Alliance for a Just, Equitable and Sustainable Recovery and Rebuild, hosted a meeting on July 19 to talk about using the reconstruction efforts to improve the lives of all North Bay residents.

    We also hear about the perils of building at the wildland urban interface, or WUI, where fires have historically been part of the life of the land.

    Reporter Adia White has more on the ideas that several speakers shared during this meeting.

    Original Source

  • Thursday, August 2nd, between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:00 pm, KRCB FM’s main 91.1 transmitter will be off the air.

    PG&E has informed us they will be replacing a power pole that serves our transmitter site. This work will result in a “service interruption.” We apologize in advance for any inconvenience this may cause our KRCB FM listeners. While the situation is beyond our control, we appreciate PG&E giving us advance notice of this outage.

    There are, of course, many ways to receive our signal: We will continue to broadcast on 90.9 FM for the greater Santa Rosa area. You can also hear us on Xfinity channel 961, and through our free mobile app available for your mobile device.

    If all goes well, we expect full power restoration by 4:00 pm.

    Thank you for your patience and understanding through this process.

    Original Source

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