ArtsCulture

  • pictures of gone cityRichard Walker is a retired professor of geography (he's not so fond of the term "emeritus") at the University of California, Berkeley. As he's described on the UC Berkeley website: "An enduring thread of Professor Walker’s thought is the logic of capitalism as an economic, political and social system, and its geographical evolution." He has written extensively about the state of California, including its agricultural and environmental heritage.
     
    In "Picutres of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity" Walker, a lifelong resident of the Bay Area, discusses the harsh realities of life for many in our communities, especially those at the bottom of the economic ladder. He presents some solutions to our housing crisis, and explores the downside of the tech revolution that has transformed the region.
     
    Discussing Walker's book, Jason W. Moore says: "Drawing on a lifetime of research, Richard Walker dismantles the mythology of the New Economhy, placing its creativity in a long history of power, work, and struggles for justice."
     
     
  • Sonoma State University is hosting an art exhibit on the aftermath of October’s wildfires. These pieces are displayed in the campus’ library gallery. KRCB’s Adia White went to see the exhibit, titled “Reflections After the Fire”. She tells us how it’s intended to help our community cope with trauma.
     
     
     
    Reflection AFter FireJerry Dodrill took photographs of lawn sculptures spared by the fires. Photo Credit: Adia WhiteLively Mosaic 1Tawnya Lively's Mosaic Work. Photo Credit: Adia White
  • SCA logoThe Sebastopol Center for the Arts has announced plans to relocate in a much larger new space. The non-profit has leased the 17,800 square foot Veterans Memorial Building in downtown Sebastopol and plans to begin remodeling in July for an anticipated fall move-in and grand opening.

    "The move to this facility more than doubles our space and will provide the community with a tremendously more robust arts scene," said Center for the Arts board president, Robert Brent. "The expansion will mean more concerts, dance performances, films, theater, classes and gallery exhibitions for the community."

    Sebastopol vetsThe Center will launch an $875,000 community fundraising campaign to upgrade the building with lighting and acoustical improvements, retractable walls and new classroom space to accommodate the expanded arts programming.

    The move, which was endorsed by the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors this week, enables the Center for the Arts to expand without undertaking a new constructiuon project, noted Executive Director Linda Galletta.The Sebastopol Veterans Building has a commercial kitchen, an auditorium with a stage, ample parking and outdoor space to accommodate a future outdoor sculpture park.

    SCAIt is also more visible than the current 9,200 square foot Arts Center, which is located on Depot Street in an industrial part of downtown Sebastopol.

    The Veterans Building will continue to be the home of VFW Post #3919 and its Auxiliary, the auditorium, dining room and kitchen will continue to be available for community use.

    The Arts Center currently has 900 members and plans are underway to grow the membership significantly now that the Center will be expanding and offering more programs in the visual, performing, literary and film arts.

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    The phrase "second responders" has been used about artists, mental health professionals and others who have been helping our community cope with grief and loss since the North Bay fires.

    An exhibition currently on view at the Chroma Gallery in Santa Rosa features work by artists processing their own reactions to October's events, and using art to help heal their community. J. Mateo Baker paid the gallery a visit and has this report.

     

     

    Here's more information about Healing by Art: After the Fires, so you can plan a visit.

    Learn more about The Fire Project at the Museums of Sonoma County, including The Fire Wall: Sharing Our Experience and The Fire Collection: Preserving Our Stories.

    Original Source

  • arms chair girl 459814

    With the school year beginning, special programs that focus on nontraditional approaches to education are also getting underway.

    One such innovation brings free weekly music lessons to a local elementary school. As Steve Mencher reports, the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts is building on a successful pilot.

    As the school year progresses, we'll hope to visit the classes, and showcase some of the student compositions right here. Below, see a performance from the pilot phase of the project.

  • GittinsPaint

    Painter Bill Gittins, a KRCB board member, is featured online today at the KQED website, talking about his experience during the Tubbs fire that burned so many homes in his Fountaingrove neighborhood.

    “I had completed about 35 new paintings for ArtTrails over the last several months, and that was while I was doing some commission pieces at the same time,” he told KQED reporter Joshua Bote.

    "Gittins has had such a history with the open-studios tour that one of his paintings — the serene Sunset Along Poppy Creek— was featured on the cover of ArtTrails’ collector guide last year. He was planning to display 60 paintings this year.

    "And then, he says, they're gone."

    The article concludes:

    "When I ask Gittins if witnessing the fire’s destruction would affect his art in any way, he rebuffs the thought. 'It’s all gonna come back,' he says. 'I will paint Santa Rosa as it needs to be, and that is with fall leaves at this point, greens and yellows and oranges, oak trees that still have 60 shades of green.'

    "With thoughts of the future, Gittins remains resolute. 'I want to make my paintings represent Sonoma County as I remember it,' he says, 'and as I know it will become.'"

  • activity art art class 730807

    Just about everyone involved agrees that arts education is important and valuable. But new survey data reveals that it is far from uniformly available to students in Sonoma County.

    The results of the survey were made public at a “data reveal” event Tuesday evening at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts. 

    KRCB previously reported on the survey when it was launched last February.

  • activity art art class 730807Just about everyone involved agrees that arts education is important and valuable. But new survey data reveals that it is far from uniformly available to students in Sonoma County.

    The results of the survey were made public at a “data reveal” event Tuesday evening at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts. 

    KRCB previously reported on the survey when it was launched last February.

  • SCGG_2007_GALLERY_GUIDE_MAPsa_logoSupport for the arts isn't just a cultural luxury. It's also an important economic engine for Sonoma County, and one that is positioning itself for growth in the year ahead.

    Volunteerism is a key to the success and survival of dozens of local arts orgnizations, and Jennifer Sloan, Executive Director of the Arts Council of Sonoma County says they have seen an uptick in that, either despite or because of higher unemployment during the economic downturn.

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    The Arts Council itself  isn't necessarily a highly visible participant in the local arts scene, but Sloan notes that they play a critical behind-the-scenes role in many more recognizable programs, such as the highly visible ArTrails open studio tour.

     

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  • ArtStart bldgMurals, mosaics and colorfully painted benches don't just happen. In many cases locally, they are the result of an unusual summer arts education program in Santa Rosa.

    ParksideThe Parkside Cafe, on Santa Rosa Avenue not far from the ArtStart building, already features three animal cutouts on its rooftop, each created by a previous ArtStart class. A pig has been commissioned to join the others this summer.ArtStart projects are a combination of commissions from the community and public artworks for the City of Santa Rosa. Creative Director Chandra Woodworth runs down the agenda the students will be developing over the next six weeks.

    A second mural project this summer will illustrate a very different cultural experience, Woodworth adds.

    mural2ArtStart students work on a mural panel under the guidance of Mario UribeArtStart is not unique to Santa Rosa, although such programs are far from common. Mario Uribe explains that the prototype was first developed in Chicago.

     

     

     

     

  • As school budgets shrink and curriculum requirements tighten, are Sonoma County students still getting taught about the arts? Creative Sonoma is trying to assess the situation, with an eye toward boosting those efforts going forward.

  • The Charles M. Schulz Museum is hosting a silent auction September 29 to raise money for wildfire relief. This year’s hot item - doghouses, painted by local artists. The museum will be auctioning 13 of these doghouses and six of them are already on display in locations around Santa Rosa. KRCB reporter Adia White went to see several of them and has this report.

     

     

    All dogs go to heavenThe Museums of Sonoma County's doghouse titled "All Dogs go to Heaven." Photo credit: Adia White

    Murhpys PadWestern Farm Center's doghouse pictured with the artist, Jesús Ponce. Photo credit: Adia White

    railroad squareThe doghouse at Chop's Teen Club features nearby Railroad Square. Photo credit: Adia White

     

  • The Charles M. Schulz Museum is hosting a silent auction September 29 to raise money for wildfire relief. This year’s hot item - doghouses, painted by local artists. The museum will be auctioning 13 of these doghouses and six of them are already on display in locations around Santa Rosa. KRCB reporter Adia White went to see several of them and has this report.

     

     

    All dogs go to heavenThe Museums of Sonoma County's doghouse titled "All Dogs go to Heaven." Photo credit: Adia White

    Murhpys PadWestern Farm Center's doghouse pictured with the artist, Jesús Ponce. Photo credit: Adia White

    railroad squareThe doghouse at Chop's Teen Club features nearby Railroad Square. Photo credit: Adia White

     

  • This week we are remembering the night the wildfires ripped through our community. In observance of the anniversary of the fires, the City of Santa Rosa invited members of the community to illustrate their experiences with chalk in Courthouse Square. In this audio postcard, KRCB reporter Adia White listens to Lisa Mast as she writes messages of hope on the sidewalk with her friends. Lisa MastCoffey Park resident Lisa Mast (right) with friend. Credit: Adia White
     
  • This week we are remembering the night the wildfires ripped through our community. In observance of the anniversary of the fires, the City of Santa Rosa invited members of the community to illustrate their experiences with chalk in Courthouse Square. In this audio postcard, KRCB reporter Adia White listens to Lisa Mast as she writes messages of hope on the sidewalk with her friends. Lisa MastCoffey Park resident Lisa Mast (right) with friend. Credit: Adia White
     
  • Seventeen schools in Sonoma County participated in a program that brings in guest artists to teach kids to cope with trauma. KRCB reporter Adia White sat in during the last class at John B. Riebli Elementary; where some students lost their homes during last year’s wildfires.  Emily SchachThird grader Emily Schach with her fairy house. Credit: Adia White



  •   Sonoma County is rich in arts and culture, but those enterprises aren’t always tuned in to each other, or supported by local business and government. As part of an effort to create a more unified vision for everyone, the Sonoma County Economic Development Board is hosting a community conversation on the subject this evening at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. Bruce Robinson talks about it with the man who will be leading the session.

    That public input session will be held from six to eight this evening at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. It’s free, but if you want to attend, you’re asked to register in advance, and you can do that here.

    Read more http://radio.krcb.org/post/cultural-and-creative-arts-forum

  • Follow artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee as she discovers materials the world casts away and invents techniques for making art from those materials.  

    Episode One - Egg Flats

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of egg flats and finds them at a local restaurant that specialized in what else eggs! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with egg flats! A HA! Lisa Gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her technique with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=39|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Two - Fruit Trays

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of fruit trays and finds them at local grocery store. Produce manager has saved her many and Lisa is now in fruit tray heaven! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making fabulous art with flexible fruit trays. A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=41|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Three - Netting

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of netting! This episode finds Lisa at Local Grocery Store where Produce manager has been saving beautiful onion bags for her. Lisa goes back to her studio to invent techniques for making great art with the netting of the onion bag! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=43|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Four - Foam Rubber

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of soft foam. Lisa arrives at creative reuse, local reuse center. where she finds soft foam aplenty. Business's donate the worlds castoffs to 'Creative Reuse' and always hopeful, Lisa finds what she needs. Back in the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with soft foam! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=40|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Five - News Paper

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee has quest for the bounty of newspaper! She finds what she needs from her friends and family! In the studio Lisa invents techniques for making art with newspaper! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=44|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Six - Styrofoam

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of Styrofoam! Lisa arrives at design studio where Styrofoam is used alot

  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of egg flats and finds them at a local restaurant that specialized in what else eggs! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with egg flats! A HA! Lisa Gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her technique with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • Sonoma County sculptor Bruce Johnson is known for his massive redwood and metal structures.

    But he has also been central to some unexpected collaborations with artists from quite different fields. 

    Sculptor Bruce Johnson’s name for his Poetry House provided a parallel for Elizabeth Herron’s long poem, The Poet’s House.  But she says the finished space was also rich in inspiration.

    Choreographer Nancy Lyons says she and her colleagues in the SoCo Dance Theater also drew inspiration from Johnson’s work—in a very tactile way.

  • Expressions 2000 features contemporary craft artists of Sonoma County.

    Paula Gregerson - Paula makes wooden boxes adorned with unusual and often playful designs. She finishes her boxes with a beautiful textured or antique look.

    {hwdvs-player}id=38|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Joel Bennet - Joel is a potter and clay sculptor. He uses an unusual technique of pit-firing his ware to achieve beautiful, unglazed yet highly colorful and polished finish.

    {hwdvs-player}id=35|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Charles Cobb- Charlie makes teapots out of wood. These are no ordinary teapots (in fact, they're not functional at all). He employs top-notch craftmanship and a retro-style flair for design in his work.

    {hwdvs-player}id=37|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Kara Raymond- Kara uses an ancient Japanese technique called mocame in her unusual metal jewelry.

    {hwdvs-player}id=36|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

  • Presentation of a Gold Resolution and Challenge Coins will be held Tuesday, January 9 at 1:30 p.m.

      

    The Sonoma County Board of Supervisors will recognize all Sonoma Complex Fire First Responders with the presentation of a Gold Resolution and commemorative challenge coins on Tuesday, January 9, 2018, at approximately 1:30 PM. Challenge coins are traditionally presented by unit commanders in recognition of special achievement by members of a unit or as awards for outstanding service or performance of duty. Sonoma County fire first responders, including all County mutual aid responders and law enforcement, are being honored. The public is welcome and encouraged to attend.  

    WHO:        Sonoma County fire first responders, including all County mutual aid responders and law enforcement  

    WHAT:         Presentation of a Gold Resolution and commemorative challenge coins  

    WHEN:        Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 1:30 PM 
    *This item is last on the resolution calendar, so the exact start time is approximate. Please plan to arrive by 1:30 PM.  

    WHERE:      575 Administration Ave, Santa Rosa, CA 95403     

    The presentation will be held directly outside of the Board of Supervisors chambers.  

     

    Original Source

  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of soft foam. Lisa arrives at creative reuse, local reuse center. where she finds soft foam aplenty. Business's donate the worlds castoffs to 'Creative Reuse' and always hopeful, Lisa finds what she needs. Back in the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with soft foam! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of fruit trays and finds them at local grocery store. Produce manager has saved her many and Lisa is now in fruit tray heaven! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making fabulous art with flexible fruit trays. A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • Arch-TworainThe monumental sculpture “Arch Tworain” that has greeted millions of visitors at the entrance to Wells Fargo Center for the Arts in Santa Rosahas been moved to a new location on the arts center’s campus.

    The relocation  of the massive white sculpture was necessary to make room for roadway changes related to construction of the new Sutter Hospital complex adjacent to the Center at River Road and Highway 101. The sculpture by Penngrove artist Robert Ellison stands at 28-feet tall and 23-feet wide. Crews used a crane to move the immense work of art, last Thursday, June 23.

  • We wanted to end the week of fire-related news with a look back at last Saturday’s Day of Remembrance at Santa Rosa Junior College.

    Earlier in the week we heard from Sheriff Rob Giordano – but now let’s listen to the music and poetry that brought the audience of several hundred to tears… and to their feet repeatedly on a crystal clear and warm fall day. You’ll hear MC Pat Kerrigan of KSRO and young poet Vicente Reyes of Mark West Charter School. Tenor Mark Kratz and soprano Linnea Hill started things off with the National Anthem.

    Local performers from Transcendence Theater Company, which sang so movingly at the event, are heading up a "Sonoma Strong Benefit Concert for California Fire Recovery" with a stellar group of Broadway artists. The benefit is 7 p.m. EST on Sunday, Nov. 5, and will stream live on the Transcendence Facebook page at 4 p.m. PST.

    Original Source

  • Yesterdaydave matthews climate, we followed California's Secretary of Food and Agriculture, Karen Ross, as she visited entrepreneurs at the Global Climate Action Summit, held in September in San Francisco.
     
    Today, we hear from one of the event's prime movers, including former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, and listen to some of the music that inspired conference-goers to action.
     
     
    (photo: Dave Matthews performs at the Global Climate Action Summit. Credit: Steve Mencher)
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  •   A new county-wide arts support organization, authorized by county supervisors this week, is intended to help expand the contribution of the arts to the local economy—both businesses

  • Gallery 1Art exhibits, film and literary events, classes in drawing, painting and ceramics and even piano lessons now share the Sebastopol Veteran's building with the local VFW chapter. And everybody's happy with the new arrangement.

    EntrySebastopol Center for the Arts Board President Robert Brent and Executive Director Linda Galletta, outside the Center’s new home at the Sebastopol Veterans Memorial Building. The local VFW chapter will also continue to call the facility home, sharing the space with the arts group. Above, the new, flexible gallery exhibit space in the building’s former auditorium. (KRCB photos)The announcement that the Sebastopol Center for the Arts would move into and take over management of the Sebastopol Veteran's Building came as a surprise to many. But Executive Director Linda Galletta says it was the culmination of a lengthy series of conversations that wound up benefitting all the parties involved.

     

     

     

     

     

  • The Wells Fargo Center for the Arts is installing a new sculpture garden, initially featuring works by local artist Bruce Johnson.

    A landscaped. meandering pathway takes viistors through the newly installed sculpture garden at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts.

        The Wells Fargo Center for the Arts is installing a new sculpture garden, initially featuring works by local artist Bruce Johnson.

     

     
     
    3:22
    Bruce Johnson with a recent work at his Timber Cove studio property.

      Sculptor Bruce Johnson has been working primarily with large masses of redwood roots and hammered copper to create his distinctive works. While the size of these giant pieces may be one of the first things to catch a viewer’s attention, Johnson says it’s the textures within them that he finds most interesting.

     

     
     
    0:27

    Original Source

  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee has quest for the bounty of newspaper! She finds what she needs from her friends and family! In the studio Lisa invents techniques for making art with newspaper! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • jack london wolf houseWriter Jack London’s home on Sonoma Mountain was nearly destroyed in last year’s wildfires. Monday October 8 at 7:30 pm, KRCB TV 22 airs a documentary about Jack London State Historic Park. "The Battle to Save Jack London's Mountain" describes the heroic efforts of park employees and others last October, as they rescured the artifacts and protected the structures connected to London's life.

    (Photo: Wolf House at Jack London State Historic Park, courtesy of park)

    Filmmaker Brent Baader spoke with KRCB news director Steve Mencher about the film.

    See video below about the park and the life of the writer who lived and worked there.

     

  • On Monday night, The City of Santa Rosa invited the community to attend a ceremony and express themselves with chalk art in Courthouse Square.

    KRCB reporter Adia White met the Terrazas family there. She listened to the stories of 15-year-old Isabella and younger brother Jesse.Their family was separated after they lost their  home in the Tubb’s fire. They are now living apart with friends and other family members. Terrazas Family Courthouse SquareThe Terrazas family, with 15-year-old Isabella on the left and 12-year-old Jesse in the middle. Credit: Adia White

  • On Monday night, The City of Santa Rosa invited the community to attend a ceremony and express themselves with chalk art in Courthouse Square.

    KRCB reporter Adia White met the Terrazas family there. She listened to the stories of 15-year-old Isabella and younger brother Jesse.Their family was separated after they lost their  home in the Tubb’s fire. They are now living apart with friends and other family members. Terrazas Family Courthouse SquareThe Terrazas family, with 15-year-old Isabella on the left and 12-year-old Jesse in the middle. Credit: Adia White

  •   The town of Sonoma will welcome the largest exhibition of public art in its history this summer.

  •   The 2014 Global Harmony Season of Offerings culminates with a week-long Days of Sakha Culture Festival on the Mendonoma coast with activities at Gualala Arts Center, Fort Ross State

  • KRCB North Bay Public Media explores the importance of arts education in in K-12 education, with a community grant from Sonoma Wine Country Weekend. View the videos on this page to learn more.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • About the National Endowment for the Arts

    The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector.

  • Conservative critics are attacking a production of William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” that’s running in New York. The basics of the play are the same as they’ve been since 1599 — the title character is deemed “ambitious” and is murdered in the Roman Senate on the Ides of March.

  • President Trump's proposed budget calls for big cuts in a wide array of domestic programs — among them, agencies that fund the arts, humanities and public media.

    Funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting would be cut to zero under the proposal, and the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities would be eliminated entirely, the first time any president has proposed such a measure.

  • The Santa Rosa Symphony continues its series of very public job interviews. This past weekend, Graeme Jenkins conducted the orchestra in performances of music by Haydn and Bartok, with pianist Orli Shaham joining the group in Mozart's Concert No.

    21 in C major for Piano and Orchestra. Attendees received an email Tuesday asking them to rate the conductor's skills and rapport with the audience. He'll be compared to the previous three candidates, and the upcoming guest conductor Michael Christie, who arrives in February for a weekend.

    Jenkins had the audience's attention immediately, as he dove into Haydn's Symphony No. 100 in G major. He drew warm, precise playing from the strings and seemed to enjoy the band's martial percussion flourishes in the second movement Allegretto. (The symphony is nicknamed "Military.")

    The Mozart concerto showed Jenkins as a steady and inspired musical partner to Shaham, whose brother, violinist Gil Shaham, is perhaps a little better known. Her reputation as a Mozart specialist was on display as her crystaline and lucid touch drew a very Classical sound from the modern concert grand onstage. Mozart requires enormous precision, but that detailed playing shouldn't be at the expense of warmth. Shaham has all those bases covered and earned an enthusiastic standing ovation from the crowd.

    After intermission, Graeme shifted to the role of music educator. He spoke engagingly about the themes of the Bartok Concerto for Orchestra, illustrating each passage musically, calling the soloists by name, and generally giving the audience a sense that if he is hired to lead the band, he'd be an approachable and informal "maestro" without any fuss or pretension.

    Although the concert I attended took place on Martin Luther King's birthday holiday, the only nod to the occasion was a statement by Jenkins that "he has a dream" for the orchestra's excellence in "world class" Weill Hall at the Green Music Center. It wasn't exactly a false note, but it emphasized the apparent lack of diversity in the orchestra and the audience. These are issues that any new conductor will undoubtedly address in time.

    The actual performance of the Bartok delivered on Jenkins' promise. It was an intelligent and emotional ride through the composer's late in life homage to his native Hungary. The audience once again awarded a standing ovation, and made it clear that Jenkins is a strong contender for the important job of leading Santa Rosa's orchestra into its next chapter.

    ---

    Steve Mencher was a radio producer at Carnegie Hall and worked for NPR'sPerformance Today music program. He's currently news director of KRCB.

    Original Source

  • Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    Transcript

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

    As we just heard, it is not easy being an artist. A lot of art history majors, in fact, make self-deprecating jokes about just how much their degrees are worth.

  • In September, WGBH traveled a few hours west on the Mass Pike to capture Brooklyn-based Big Thief performing live at Gateway City Arts in Holyoke, Mass.

    Guitarist Buck Meek was not able to make the show, so the band's set took on a particularly intimate vibe interspersed with moments of full-volume energy.

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