Live from The Freight & Salvage

ArtsCulture

  • Hairspray at BAM 2019 26It’s a time capsule of a time capsule, looking back to the 1988 John Waters film, the 2002 Tony-winning Broadway musical and the 2007 film starring John Travolta. So why does Hairspray seem so fresh and of the moment in its summer 2019 San Francisco incarnation?

    Maybe it’s the lineage of the character of Edna Turnblad, originally played by Divine, then by Harvey Fierstein on Broadway and John Travolta in the musical film. The idea that the story’s mom is played casually by a man stands the whole world on its end and throws the musical’s story of racial prejudice and empowerment into relief.

    After more than 30 years of living with this story, perhaps the biggest deal is that the casting, baked into Hairspray from its earliest days, is no big deal.

    So how does Scott DiLorenzo do as Edna? Exactly right. He’s all woman, coping with a sometimes-trying daughter, flirting with her devoted hubby and never playing Edna for cheap laughs or gender dysphoric chuckles. Yes, there are a couple of times when Edna’s voice drops a few octaves in moments of drama, but that’s just a time for audience and actors to share a quick joke. It emphasizes, rather than detracts from the story’s powerful message that race, gender, age, weight, you name it – these are all part of who we are, but none of them separates us from our brother and sister humans.

    Sorry – I should be talking about the show by now. This Bay Area Musicals production is barrels of fun. Every single character feels right, seems honest, relates to others in both that broad show business way and the way we confront or partner with the other people in our own orbit.

    The voices are Broadway silver: bright, on pitch, cutting through, and blending with each other seamlessly.

    [Image: Scott DiLorenzo as Edna Turnblad. Credit: Ben Krantz Studio] 

    My one, and it’s only one, complaint is that the amplification tends toward the deafening, and we are bludgeoned sometimes, especially when everyone is at their full-throated best. Turn it down, folks. Trust the glorious voices of your talented cast.

    Don’t know the show? I should give your phone number to the young woman in the row in front of us who had seen it more times than she could count and listened to the cast album “millions” of times. But the setting is Baltimore in the early 1960s. Our plus-size heroine, Tracy Turnblad (Cassie Grilley), rushes home each day to turn on the live Corny Collins (Scott Taylor-Cole) dance show, where (all-white) kids play the part of teenagers enjoying the dance music of the day. When the director yells “cut” they’re just kids, but we know, if they don’t, that “Negro Day,” the once-a-month time when kids from the other (wrong) side of the tracks take over, will be where the real action is.

    That is, unless Tracy and her friend Penny Pingleton, can find a way for the black and white kids to dance together, leading the way to another, perhaps unreal, era. The enormously talented Seaweed J. Stubbs (Dave Abrams) and Motormouth Maybelle (Elizabeth Jones) quickly demonstrate why Baltimore’s black culture contributes immeasurably to the city’s soul.

    The show starts with a bang. “Good Morning Baltimore” romanticizes the city’s flashers and deadbeats as well as its energetic and lively teens. We know from the get-go that this will be an all-singing all-dancing don’t-stop-or-slow-down-at-any-cost juggernaut.

    The small band is spot on, led by music director Jon Gallo; the sets by Lynn Grant are comic book simple; the costumes (by Brooke Jennings) feel like the 1960s.

    Another standout in the cast is Melissa Momboisse, as Penny Pingleton, who has that great part in musicals where the mousy best friend becomes a (spoiler alert) sexy femme fatale. Her transition is perfect.

    Gotta free evening between now and August 11? Run, don’t walk to the Victoria Theatre 2961 16th Street, where gender fluidity reigns and love is in the air. 

    To save $10.00 Off* Tickets Use Code: BAM10

    Below - Dave Abrams as Seaweed J. Stubbs goes airborne. Credit: Ben Krantz Studio

    Hairspray at BAM 2019 13

    Cassie Grilley IS Tracy Turnblad: Credit: Ben Krantz Studio

    Hairspray at BAM 2019 1

  • pictures of gone cityRichard Walker is a retired professor of geography (he's not so fond of the term "emeritus") at the University of California, Berkeley. As he's described on the UC Berkeley website: "An enduring thread of Professor Walker’s thought is the logic of capitalism as an economic, political and social system, and its geographical evolution." He has written extensively about the state of California, including its agricultural and environmental heritage.
     
    In "Picutres of a Gone City: Tech and the Dark Side of Prosperity" Walker, a lifelong resident of the Bay Area, discusses the harsh realities of life for many in our communities, especially those at the bottom of the economic ladder. He presents some solutions to our housing crisis, and explores the downside of the tech revolution that has transformed the region.
     
    Discussing Walker's book, Jason W. Moore says: "Drawing on a lifetime of research, Richard Walker dismantles the mythology of the New Economhy, placing its creativity in a long history of power, work, and struggles for justice."
     
     
  • Sonoma State University is hosting an art exhibit on the aftermath of October’s wildfires. These pieces are displayed in the campus’ library gallery. KRCB’s Adia White went to see the exhibit, titled “Reflections After the Fire”. She tells us how it’s intended to help our community cope with trauma.
     
     
     
    Reflection AFter FireJerry Dodrill took photographs of lawn sculptures spared by the fires. Photo Credit: Adia WhiteLively Mosaic 1Tawnya Lively's Mosaic Work. Photo Credit: Adia White
  • SCA logoThe Sebastopol Center for the Arts has announced plans to relocate in a much larger new space. The non-profit has leased the 17,800 square foot Veterans Memorial Building in downtown Sebastopol and plans to begin remodeling in July for an anticipated fall move-in and grand opening.

    "The move to this facility more than doubles our space and will provide the community with a tremendously more robust arts scene," said Center for the Arts board president, Robert Brent. "The expansion will mean more concerts, dance performances, films, theater, classes and gallery exhibitions for the community."

    Sebastopol vetsThe Center will launch an $875,000 community fundraising campaign to upgrade the building with lighting and acoustical improvements, retractable walls and new classroom space to accommodate the expanded arts programming.

    The move, which was endorsed by the Sonoma County Board of Supervisors this week, enables the Center for the Arts to expand without undertaking a new constructiuon project, noted Executive Director Linda Galletta.The Sebastopol Veterans Building has a commercial kitchen, an auditorium with a stage, ample parking and outdoor space to accommodate a future outdoor sculpture park.

    SCAIt is also more visible than the current 9,200 square foot Arts Center, which is located on Depot Street in an industrial part of downtown Sebastopol.

    The Veterans Building will continue to be the home of VFW Post #3919 and its Auxiliary, the auditorium, dining room and kitchen will continue to be available for community use.

    The Arts Center currently has 900 members and plans are underway to grow the membership significantly now that the Center will be expanding and offering more programs in the visual, performing, literary and film arts.

  • art backlit beach 256807

     

    The phrase "second responders" has been used about artists, mental health professionals and others who have been helping our community cope with grief and loss since the North Bay fires.

    An exhibition currently on view at the Chroma Gallery in Santa Rosa features work by artists processing their own reactions to October's events, and using art to help heal their community. J. Mateo Baker paid the gallery a visit and has this report.

     

     

    Here's more information about Healing by Art: After the Fires, so you can plan a visit.

    Learn more about The Fire Project at the Museums of Sonoma County, including The Fire Wall: Sharing Our Experience and The Fire Collection: Preserving Our Stories.

    Original Source

  • arms chair girl 459814

    With the school year beginning, special programs that focus on nontraditional approaches to education are also getting underway.

    One such innovation brings free weekly music lessons to a local elementary school. As Steve Mencher reports, the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts is building on a successful pilot.

    As the school year progresses, we'll hope to visit the classes, and showcase some of the student compositions right here. Below, see a performance from the pilot phase of the project.

  • GittinsPaint

    Painter Bill Gittins, a KRCB board member, is featured online today at the KQED website, talking about his experience during the Tubbs fire that burned so many homes in his Fountaingrove neighborhood.

    “I had completed about 35 new paintings for ArtTrails over the last several months, and that was while I was doing some commission pieces at the same time,” he told KQED reporter Joshua Bote.

    "Gittins has had such a history with the open-studios tour that one of his paintings — the serene Sunset Along Poppy Creek— was featured on the cover of ArtTrails’ collector guide last year. He was planning to display 60 paintings this year.

    "And then, he says, they're gone."

    The article concludes:

    "When I ask Gittins if witnessing the fire’s destruction would affect his art in any way, he rebuffs the thought. 'It’s all gonna come back,' he says. 'I will paint Santa Rosa as it needs to be, and that is with fall leaves at this point, greens and yellows and oranges, oak trees that still have 60 shades of green.'

    "With thoughts of the future, Gittins remains resolute. 'I want to make my paintings represent Sonoma County as I remember it,' he says, 'and as I know it will become.'"

  • activity art art class 730807

    Just about everyone involved agrees that arts education is important and valuable. But new survey data reveals that it is far from uniformly available to students in Sonoma County.

    The results of the survey were made public at a “data reveal” event Tuesday evening at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts. 

    KRCB previously reported on the survey when it was launched last February.

  • activity art art class 730807Just about everyone involved agrees that arts education is important and valuable. But new survey data reveals that it is far from uniformly available to students in Sonoma County.

    The results of the survey were made public at a “data reveal” event Tuesday evening at the Luther Burbank Center for the Arts. 

    KRCB previously reported on the survey when it was launched last February.

  • SCGG_2007_GALLERY_GUIDE_MAPsa_logoSupport for the arts isn't just a cultural luxury. It's also an important economic engine for Sonoma County, and one that is positioning itself for growth in the year ahead.

    Volunteerism is a key to the success and survival of dozens of local arts orgnizations, and Jennifer Sloan, Executive Director of the Arts Council of Sonoma County says they have seen an uptick in that, either despite or because of higher unemployment during the economic downturn.

    25th-artrails

    The Arts Council itself  isn't necessarily a highly visible participant in the local arts scene, but Sloan notes that they play a critical behind-the-scenes role in many more recognizable programs, such as the highly visible ArTrails open studio tour.

     

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  • ArtStart bldgMurals, mosaics and colorfully painted benches don't just happen. In many cases locally, they are the result of an unusual summer arts education program in Santa Rosa.

    ParksideThe Parkside Cafe, on Santa Rosa Avenue not far from the ArtStart building, already features three animal cutouts on its rooftop, each created by a previous ArtStart class. A pig has been commissioned to join the others this summer.ArtStart projects are a combination of commissions from the community and public artworks for the City of Santa Rosa. Creative Director Chandra Woodworth runs down the agenda the students will be developing over the next six weeks.

    A second mural project this summer will illustrate a very different cultural experience, Woodworth adds.

    mural2ArtStart students work on a mural panel under the guidance of Mario UribeArtStart is not unique to Santa Rosa, although such programs are far from common. Mario Uribe explains that the prototype was first developed in Chicago.

     

     

     

     

  • As school budgets shrink and curriculum requirements tighten, are Sonoma County students still getting taught about the arts? Creative Sonoma is trying to assess the situation, with an eye toward boosting those efforts going forward.

  • exiled coverExiled is author Katya Cengel’s recent book about Cambodian refugees in California. In the light of current refugee policies, it’s instructive to learn about how some of these residents face deportation and uncertainty if they run afoul of U.S. law.

    Hovering in the background of the story: the Cambodian genocide, in which millions perished in the late 1970s.

    Cengel spoke with KRCB news director Steve Mencher about the origins of her book.

     

  • The Charles M. Schulz Museum is hosting a silent auction September 29 to raise money for wildfire relief. This year’s hot item - doghouses, painted by local artists. The museum will be auctioning 13 of these doghouses and six of them are already on display in locations around Santa Rosa. KRCB reporter Adia White went to see several of them and has this report.

     

     

    All dogs go to heavenThe Museums of Sonoma County's doghouse titled "All Dogs go to Heaven." Photo credit: Adia White

    Murhpys PadWestern Farm Center's doghouse pictured with the artist, Jesús Ponce. Photo credit: Adia White

    railroad squareThe doghouse at Chop's Teen Club features nearby Railroad Square. Photo credit: Adia White

     

  • The Charles M. Schulz Museum is hosting a silent auction September 29 to raise money for wildfire relief. This year’s hot item - doghouses, painted by local artists. The museum will be auctioning 13 of these doghouses and six of them are already on display in locations around Santa Rosa. KRCB reporter Adia White went to see several of them and has this report.

     

     

    All dogs go to heavenThe Museums of Sonoma County's doghouse titled "All Dogs go to Heaven." Photo credit: Adia White

    Murhpys PadWestern Farm Center's doghouse pictured with the artist, Jesús Ponce. Photo credit: Adia White

    railroad squareThe doghouse at Chop's Teen Club features nearby Railroad Square. Photo credit: Adia White

     

  • This week we are remembering the night the wildfires ripped through our community. In observance of the anniversary of the fires, the City of Santa Rosa invited members of the community to illustrate their experiences with chalk in Courthouse Square. In this audio postcard, KRCB reporter Adia White listens to Lisa Mast as she writes messages of hope on the sidewalk with her friends. Lisa MastCoffey Park resident Lisa Mast (right) with friend. Credit: Adia White
     
  • This week we are remembering the night the wildfires ripped through our community. In observance of the anniversary of the fires, the City of Santa Rosa invited members of the community to illustrate their experiences with chalk in Courthouse Square. In this audio postcard, KRCB reporter Adia White listens to Lisa Mast as she writes messages of hope on the sidewalk with her friends. Lisa MastCoffey Park resident Lisa Mast (right) with friend. Credit: Adia White
     
  • Seventeen schools in Sonoma County participated in a program that brings in guest artists to teach kids to cope with trauma. KRCB reporter Adia White sat in during the last class at John B. Riebli Elementary; where some students lost their homes during last year’s wildfires.  Emily SchachThird grader Emily Schach with her fairy house. Credit: Adia White



  •   Sonoma County is rich in arts and culture, but those enterprises aren’t always tuned in to each other, or supported by local business and government. As part of an effort to create a more unified vision for everyone, the Sonoma County Economic Development Board is hosting a community conversation on the subject this evening at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. Bruce Robinson talks about it with the man who will be leading the session.

    That public input session will be held from six to eight this evening at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts. It’s free, but if you want to attend, you’re asked to register in advance, and you can do that here.

    Read more http://radio.krcb.org/post/cultural-and-creative-arts-forum

  • Every year the Hopland Research Extension Center hosts an annual sheep dog trial. Contestants and their dogs travel to Mendocino county, in hopes of earning points that will help them qualify for the national sheep herding competition, which take place in October of next year. KRCB’s Adia White went to this year’s event on Nov. 11th and has this report. Contestant Ronda Lauritson and her dog Tarn. Credit: Adia WhiteContestant Rhonda Lauritsen and her dog Tarn. Credit: Adia White 
     
  • Follow artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee as she discovers materials the world casts away and invents techniques for making art from those materials.  

    Episode One - Egg Flats

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of egg flats and finds them at a local restaurant that specialized in what else eggs! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with egg flats! A HA! Lisa Gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her technique with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=39|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Two - Fruit Trays

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of fruit trays and finds them at local grocery store. Produce manager has saved her many and Lisa is now in fruit tray heaven! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making fabulous art with flexible fruit trays. A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=41|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Three - Netting

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of netting! This episode finds Lisa at Local Grocery Store where Produce manager has been saving beautiful onion bags for her. Lisa goes back to her studio to invent techniques for making great art with the netting of the onion bag! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=43|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Four - Foam Rubber

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of soft foam. Lisa arrives at creative reuse, local reuse center. where she finds soft foam aplenty. Business's donate the worlds castoffs to 'Creative Reuse' and always hopeful, Lisa finds what she needs. Back in the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with soft foam! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=40|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Five - News Paper

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee has quest for the bounty of newspaper! She finds what she needs from her friends and family! In the studio Lisa invents techniques for making art with newspaper! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

    WATCH THE VIDEO: {hwdvs-player}id=44|height=83|width=125|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Episode Six - Styrofoam

    Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of Styrofoam! Lisa arrives at design studio where Styrofoam is used alot

  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of egg flats and finds them at a local restaurant that specialized in what else eggs! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with egg flats! A HA! Lisa Gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her technique with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • Sonoma County sculptor Bruce Johnson is known for his massive redwood and metal structures.

    But he has also been central to some unexpected collaborations with artists from quite different fields. 

    Sculptor Bruce Johnson’s name for his Poetry House provided a parallel for Elizabeth Herron’s long poem, The Poet’s House.  But she says the finished space was also rich in inspiration.

    Choreographer Nancy Lyons says she and her colleagues in the SoCo Dance Theater also drew inspiration from Johnson’s work—in a very tactile way.

  • Expressions 2000 features contemporary craft artists of Sonoma County.

    Paula Gregerson - Paula makes wooden boxes adorned with unusual and often playful designs. She finishes her boxes with a beautiful textured or antique look.

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    Joel Bennet - Joel is a potter and clay sculptor. He uses an unusual technique of pit-firing his ware to achieve beautiful, unglazed yet highly colorful and polished finish.

    {hwdvs-player}id=35|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Charles Cobb- Charlie makes teapots out of wood. These are no ordinary teapots (in fact, they're not functional at all). He employs top-notch craftmanship and a retro-style flair for design in his work.

    {hwdvs-player}id=37|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

    Kara Raymond- Kara uses an ancient Japanese technique called mocame in her unusual metal jewelry.

    {hwdvs-player}id=36|height=320|width=427|tpl=lightbox|thumb_width=200|autoplay=1{/hwdvs-player}

  • In this Cloverdale profile, we meet Adrian, a construction worker. He is dedicated to learning in order to help further his place in life. “I want to learn, I don’t get tired of learning.” He sees that hard work and education hold the keys to his future. 

  • Ali Samii believes in the future of Roseland, and works for the Northern California Center for Well-Being.  He is a graduate of Santa Rosa Junior College and getting a further degree at Sonoma State University.  He directs Project TRUE, which is a youth peer education program. "I love getting to work with the community, and seeing the desire for change they have for bettering the community." 

  • Roseland educator Anna Solano grew up in Mexico and moved to the United States at 17 years of age. She was inspired by the American education system. She worked hard, learned English and got a college scholarship. “I grew up I learned about myself, I learned to be more confident. For me, it was the best years of my life."

  • Isabel Basaldua Ontiveros lives in Cloverdale and has a job cleaning houses. Her family has transportation challenges and would benefit from better public transportation. “We are looking for something better..for the best things for our families and this is why we move and immigrated from Mexico to the United States."

  • This Cloverdale Profile introduces us to John Gastineau. He is a teacher and coach at Cloverdale High School.  He is proud of the students at his school and thinks they have a bright future. “Your voice can be important. If you can speak up and generate some interest, you can have some power."

  • This Roseland community profile explores the inspirations of Santa Rosa Mayor, John Sawyer. He believes in the power of volunteering.  “It creates an environment where you’re learning all the time.” Through this foundation, people learn about each other and the needs of their community.

  • Julia Carranza has worked for the Rosalind school district for 22 years. She believes in good nutrition for children and devoted her life to providing healthy food for youngsters so they can grow up healthy. “I would like to see a place where children will have opportunities to learn crafts, sports, film, art, dance, so many things."

  • Patty Bird is a third generation Cloverdale resident. She is involved in a group that supports youth sports and outdoor spaces. A former student athlete herself, she says, "I think more things to do for the youth here in town would be nice.  Where the youth could gather, respect each other and learn from each other."

  • Rose Lyle is a lifetime resident of Cloverdale. She loves the community. Although she remembers better years for her community, she sees a lot of hope and promise for the people of her town.  “There was never any reason for us to leave.” She found everything she needed in her hometown.

  • Presentation of a Gold Resolution and Challenge Coins will be held Tuesday, January 9 at 1:30 p.m.

      

    The Sonoma County Board of Supervisors will recognize all Sonoma Complex Fire First Responders with the presentation of a Gold Resolution and commemorative challenge coins on Tuesday, January 9, 2018, at approximately 1:30 PM. Challenge coins are traditionally presented by unit commanders in recognition of special achievement by members of a unit or as awards for outstanding service or performance of duty. Sonoma County fire first responders, including all County mutual aid responders and law enforcement, are being honored. The public is welcome and encouraged to attend.  

    WHO:        Sonoma County fire first responders, including all County mutual aid responders and law enforcement  

    WHAT:         Presentation of a Gold Resolution and commemorative challenge coins  

    WHEN:        Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 1:30 PM 
    *This item is last on the resolution calendar, so the exact start time is approximate. Please plan to arrive by 1:30 PM.  

    WHERE:      575 Administration Ave, Santa Rosa, CA 95403     

    The presentation will be held directly outside of the Board of Supervisors chambers.  

     

    Original Source

  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of soft foam. Lisa arrives at creative reuse, local reuse center. where she finds soft foam aplenty. Business's donate the worlds castoffs to 'Creative Reuse' and always hopeful, Lisa finds what she needs. Back in the studio Lisa invents techniques for making great art with soft foam! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • Join us for a free screening of these important public television documentary programs. Meet staff members from NorCal Public Media at our information booth and watch locally-produced video shorts about early childhood education and the opioid crisis in the Bay Area.
     
    NeighborVerticalIndie Lens Pop-Up:
    Won't You Be My Neighbor?
     
    Rialto Cinemas Sebastopol
    6868 McKinley Street, Sebastopol, CA 95472
    Monday March 11 at 1 & 7 pm
     
    Rialto Cinemas Elmwood
    2966 College Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94705
    Wednesday, March 27 at 7 pm
     
    From Academy Award-winning filmmaker Morgan Neville (20 Feet from Stardom), Won't You Be My Neighbor? takes an intimate look at America's favorite neighbor: Mister Fred Rogers. A portrait of a man whom we all think we know, this emotional and moving film takes us beyond the zip-up cardigans and the land of make-believe, and into the heart of a creative genius who inspired generations of children with compassion and limitless imagination.
     
     
    ProvidersHorizontalIndie Lens Pop-Up:
    The Providers
     
    Rialto Cinemas Sebastopol
    6868 McKinley Street, Sebastopol, CA 95472
    Monday, March 25 at 1 & 7 pm
     
    Rialto Cinemas Elmwood
    2966 College Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94705
    Tuesday, April 2 at 7 pm
     
    Set against the backdrop of the physician shortage and opioid epidemic in rural America, The Providers follows three "country doctors" in northern New Mexico at clinics that offer care to all who walk through the doors, regardless of ability to pay. With personal struggles that at times reflect those of their patients, the journeys of the providers unfold as they work to reach Americans who would otherwise be left without healthcare.
     
     
  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee goes in search of fruit trays and finds them at local grocery store. Produce manager has saved her many and Lisa is now in fruit tray heaven! Back to the studio Lisa invents techniques for making fabulous art with flexible fruit trays. A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • greg sarris supplied hi res cropThis week brings the paperback release of a story collection from writer and teacher Greg Sarris. You may know Sarris from his other job – Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria.

    KRCB News Director Steve Mencher has a special 2-part interview with Greg Sarris.

    Today – Sarris the author. Tomorrow, we’ll focus on his leadership role with the tribe.

    To begin, Greg Sarris reads the introduction to “How a Mountain Was Made.”

     

     

    In part two of our interview, we asked Tribal Chairman Greg Sarris about news we've heard that the tribe is getting ready to ramp up its giving to environmental and social causes. We've heard figures as high as hundreds of millions of dollars. He provided some details.

     

     

     

  • lecce chong orchestra rehearsal cropThis past weekend, Francesco Lecce-Chong, the new music director of the Santa Rosa Symphony, conducted his final subscription program for the season. He led the orchestra in works by Mozart, Mahler and Japanese composer Toru Takemitsu.

    Before last Wednesday’s rehearsal, he sat down with KRCB News Director Steve Mencher to talk about the orchestra, and about the audience for classical music – which many critics and fans worry is older and not growing.

    {Image: Francesco Lecce-Chong, in his first year as music director of the Santa Rosa Symphony, conducts a rehearsal of Mahler's Fourth Symphony on January 9, 2019 in Weill Hall at the Green Center in Rohnert Park. Credit: Steve Mencher)

    From the Symphony: 

    Santa Rosa Symphony presents "Vivaldi's Ring of Mystery," an affordable family concert on Sunday, January 27 at the Green Music Center. Ideal for sharing with young children, the 3 PM program includes excerpts from Vivaldi's famous works and explores 18th-century Venice with young orphan violinist Katarina. More information on this January 27 concert at srsymphony.org or (707) 54-MUSIC.

  • IMG 0934Sarah Bohannon and Steve Mencher accept the award for "Letter from Santa Rosa."NorCal Public Media won three national journalism awards for projects produced in 2018. KRCB News Director Steve Mencher accepted the awards at The Public Radio Journalists Association conference in Washington D.C. on June 17. The Public Radio Journalists Association awards are among the most prestigious in broadcast news. 

    Category: Podcast, First Place

    The episode "The Forgotten Civilians of Eglin Air Force Base" from our environmental justice podcast "Living Downstream" won first place in the podcasting division for small stations.  During the Vietnam War, civilians at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida tested Agent Orange, and many suffered health consequences from their work. Before the podcast episode was heard, and an excerpt broadcast on NPR’s “Here and Now,” there was little hope that this issue could find its way to the courts. Today there’s hope. This story was produced by Jon Kalish and edited by KRCB News Director Steve Mencher.

    Category: Best Collaborative Effort, First Place

    As the communities of Paradise and Chico felt the full fury of the 2018 wildfires, the most destructive in Calif. history, NSPR began a daily show about the fire and its aftermath called “After Paradise.” NorCal Public Media teamed up with NSPR on a “Letter from Santa Rosa,”interviewing survivors of the 2017 Tubbs fires who had advice on resiliency and self-care for their neighbors to the north. This collaboration won first place in its division. This story was produced in partnership by KRCB's Adia White and Steve Mencher and NSPR's Sarah Bohannon. Tess Vigeland hosted this episode.

    Cartoonist Brian Fies, interviewed in this episode, worked with public radio station KQED to create an animation of his experience. Watch his story below.

    Category: Best Collaborative Effort, Second Place

    When Roseland was annexed into Santa Rosa, we wanted to investigate how politics might play out in the everyday lives of residents, especially in the area of health. Our series "Will the Annexation of Roseland Improve the Community's Health" won second place in the collaboration division. The work was facilitated by the Latino Public Radio Consortium and funded by the USC-Annenberg Center for Health Journalism. KBBF's Edgar Ávila produced the series in partnership with KRCB's Steve Mencher and Adia White.

  • Arch-TworainThe monumental sculpture “Arch Tworain” that has greeted millions of visitors at the entrance to Wells Fargo Center for the Arts in Santa Rosahas been moved to a new location on the arts center’s campus.

    The relocation  of the massive white sculpture was necessary to make room for roadway changes related to construction of the new Sutter Hospital complex adjacent to the Center at River Road and Highway 101. The sculpture by Penngrove artist Robert Ellison stands at 28-feet tall and 23-feet wide. Crews used a crane to move the immense work of art, last Thursday, June 23.

  • Oakland Temple resizeThe iconic Mormon temple visible from Highway 13 in Oakland is open to the public for a limited time through early June.
     
    According to the website of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, the temple will be rededicated on June 16, after which only Mormons with a special ticket from their spiritual leaders will be allowed to enter the sacred space. That's the way it's been since the temple opened in 1964.
     
    We were lucky enough to get a tour of the temple on May 6, and will be sharing that experience in coming days.
     
    At right: The exterior of the Mormon temple in Oakland. Below: The baptismal font. Mormons are known for their practice of baptism by proxy. They have worked with Jewish organizations to cease baptisms of victims of the Holocaust.
     
     During the media tour of the temple in early May, KRCB news director Steve Mencher spoke with two members of the church leadership.
     
     
     
    LDS Oakland Baptismal Font 01 resize
  • We wanted to end the week of fire-related news with a look back at last Saturday’s Day of Remembrance at Santa Rosa Junior College.

    Earlier in the week we heard from Sheriff Rob Giordano – but now let’s listen to the music and poetry that brought the audience of several hundred to tears… and to their feet repeatedly on a crystal clear and warm fall day. You’ll hear MC Pat Kerrigan of KSRO and young poet Vicente Reyes of Mark West Charter School. Tenor Mark Kratz and soprano Linnea Hill started things off with the National Anthem.

    Local performers from Transcendence Theater Company, which sang so movingly at the event, are heading up a "Sonoma Strong Benefit Concert for California Fire Recovery" with a stellar group of Broadway artists. The benefit is 7 p.m. EST on Sunday, Nov. 5, and will stream live on the Transcendence Facebook page at 4 p.m. PST.

    Original Source

  • Yesterdaydave matthews climate, we followed California's Secretary of Food and Agriculture, Karen Ross, as she visited entrepreneurs at the Global Climate Action Summit, held in September in San Francisco.
     
    Today, we hear from some of the event's prime movers, including former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, and listen to some of the music that inspired conference-goers to action.
     
     
    (photo: Dave Matthews performs at the Global Climate Action Summit. Credit: Steve Mencher)
  •  
  • fiorello thomson cropSan Francisco's 42nd Street Moon theater company is revisiting a golden age classic this month. Fiorello! tells the story of an Italian lawyer, then Congressman, who connects with the vibrant immigrant community as mayor of New York City in the 1930s and 40s.
     
    He also learns to love the woman who sticks by him throughout his political career as he suffers heartbreaking personal setbacks, including the death of his wife. 
     
    Broadway musicals of past eras often struggle with gender stereotypes, and this one is no different. The show has its share of dumb blondes, and even the mayor's loyal aide, though trod upon, shows a little too much fortitude, waiting for her guy to come around. But the musical's bucketfuls of great tunes and big heart eventually overcome the embedded sexism, and deliver a satisfying evening of theater.
     
    As Fiorello LaGuardia, Colin Thomson approaches his role with an unvarying operatic pitch. He practically sings his dialogue, except for a small moment of doubt. For me, Thomson's approach could have been varied a bit. He could have learned something from his costar, Katrina Lauren McGraw, whose Marie is much more fully realized.
     
    The show's earworms include the wonderful "Politics and Poker" and Marie's tender ballad "I'll Marry the Very Next Man." Luckily for Mayor LaGuardia, that's him.
     
    (Image: Colin Thomson as Fiorello! Credit: Ben Krantz Studio)
     
     
  •   A new county-wide arts support organization, authorized by county supervisors this week, is intended to help expand the contribution of the arts to the local economy—both businesses

  • InvisibleBars WEB 1On April 15, KRCB TV 22 will present Invisible Bars, about new California programs that take into account the damage done to families in the age of runaway incarceration.

    Filmmaker John Beck came to our studios with Fred Stillman, who served more than two decades in California prisons for murder. and his daughter Jessica – one of his seven children – who  works in Santa Rosa.

    Jessica started visiting her dad in prison at age 9 – she’s now in her early 30s. Her visits used to be behind glass partitions, until prison officials realized that true healing demanded physical contact. 

    The film gained unparalleled access into several prisons, including California State Prison, Solano, in Vacaville and San Quentin in Marin County.

    Part Two -

    Fred Stillman, who served 23 years for murder in California prisons, and his daughter Jessica have both benefitted from an improved climate in California prisons, where psychologists and prison officials realize that family connections can play a positive role in prisoners' lives.

    Flimmaker John Beck tells their story, and that of other families, in his new documentary Invisible Bars, about new approaches to therapy and counseling in prison that put families first.

    The film will air on KRCB TV 22 Monday night at 9.

    Jessica told KRCB news director Steve Mencher that children whose parents are incarcerated may suffer long term health effects.

     

    Watch the trailer for Invisible Bars.

    And you can read about the film in these local media outlets:

    https://www.bohemian.com/northbay/lost-time/Content?oid=8364951

    https://datebook.sfchronicle.com/movies-tv/reel-local-news-charting-damage-done-to-bay-area-prisoners-families

    https://www.marinij.com/2019/02/28/how-the-grateful-dead-inspired-a-nonprofit-for-kids-with-parents-in-prison/

     

     

  • Gallery 1Art exhibits, film and literary events, classes in drawing, painting and ceramics and even piano lessons now share the Sebastopol Veteran's building with the local VFW chapter. And everybody's happy with the new arrangement.

    EntrySebastopol Center for the Arts Board President Robert Brent and Executive Director Linda Galletta, outside the Center’s new home at the Sebastopol Veterans Memorial Building. The local VFW chapter will also continue to call the facility home, sharing the space with the arts group. Above, the new, flexible gallery exhibit space in the building’s former auditorium. (KRCB photos)The announcement that the Sebastopol Center for the Arts would move into and take over management of the Sebastopol Veteran's Building came as a surprise to many. But Executive Director Linda Galletta says it was the culmination of a lengthy series of conversations that wound up benefitting all the parties involved.

     

     

     

     

     

  • The Wells Fargo Center for the Arts is installing a new sculpture garden, initially featuring works by local artist Bruce Johnson.

    A landscaped. meandering pathway takes viistors through the newly installed sculpture garden at the Wells Fargo Center for the Arts.

        The Wells Fargo Center for the Arts is installing a new sculpture garden, initially featuring works by local artist Bruce Johnson.

     

     
     
    3:22
    Bruce Johnson with a recent work at his Timber Cove studio property.

      Sculptor Bruce Johnson has been working primarily with large masses of redwood roots and hammered copper to create his distinctive works. While the size of these giant pieces may be one of the first things to catch a viewer’s attention, Johnson says it’s the textures within them that he finds most interesting.

     

     
     
    0:27

    Original Source

  • Artist Lisa R. Fredenthal-Lee has quest for the bounty of newspaper! She finds what she needs from her friends and family! In the studio Lisa invents techniques for making art with newspaper! A HA! Lisa gets ideas! How unlike her! Lisa shares her techniques with her young artists who proceed to make great art of their own!

  • jack london wolf houseWriter Jack London’s home on Sonoma Mountain was nearly destroyed in last year’s wildfires. Monday October 8 at 7:30 pm, KRCB TV 22 airs a documentary about Jack London State Historic Park. "The Battle to Save Jack London's Mountain" describes the heroic efforts of park employees and others last October, as they rescured the artifacts and protected the structures connected to London's life.

    (Photo: Wolf House at Jack London State Historic Park, courtesy of park)

    Filmmaker Brent Baader spoke with KRCB news director Steve Mencher about the film.

    See video below about the park and the life of the writer who lived and worked there.

     

  • On Monday night, The City of Santa Rosa invited the community to attend a ceremony and express themselves with chalk art in Courthouse Square.

    KRCB reporter Adia White met the Terrazas family there. She listened to the stories of 15-year-old Isabella and younger brother Jesse.Their family was separated after they lost their  home in the Tubb’s fire. They are now living apart with friends and other family members. Terrazas Family Courthouse SquareThe Terrazas family, with 15-year-old Isabella on the left and 12-year-old Jesse in the middle. Credit: Adia White

  • On Monday night, The City of Santa Rosa invited the community to attend a ceremony and express themselves with chalk art in Courthouse Square.

    KRCB reporter Adia White met the Terrazas family there. She listened to the stories of 15-year-old Isabella and younger brother Jesse.Their family was separated after they lost their  home in the Tubb’s fire. They are now living apart with friends and other family members. Terrazas Family Courthouse SquareThe Terrazas family, with 15-year-old Isabella on the left and 12-year-old Jesse in the middle. Credit: Adia White

  • View the embedded image gallery online at:
    https://norcalpublicmedia.org/tag/art#sigProId98d492bde7
    Rob photoPolitical cartoonist Rob Rogers was fired from his job at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette last year after being told to stop drawing unflattering cartoons of Donald Trump. His termination made national headlines and sparked debate about freedom of the press and political censorship. Roger’s book about the experience, titled “Enemy of the People,” comes out in July. KRCB reporter Adia White spoke with him about it at his book signing at the Charles Schulz Museum last week. 

    (Image Right: Cartoonist Rob Rogers. Courtesy of the subject.)

    (Image Left: Click for a slide show of Rogers' cartoons.)

     

  •   The town of Sonoma will welcome the largest exhibition of public art in its history this summer.

  • forrest gander websiteForrest Gander is the winner of this year's Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. He was born in California, has lived in Mexico, and taught at Brown University in Rhode Island. But he's always wanted to come home to California. Now, he's a full time resident of Petaluma, enjoying the beautiful setting of his home and the diversity of his neighbors.

    Gander believes that interest in poetry is cyclical, and that we're living in a time of increasing attention to it, especially among young people, and despite society's fixation on "spectacle." 

    His prize-winning collection, Be With, is a book of elegies, a public mourning of recent losses. One set of verses is a loving portrait of his mother, who lives in Virginia and has Alzheimer's Disease. He read some of that for us:

     (Image: Forrest Gander. Credit: ForrestGander.com)

     

    The life-changing nature of the Pulitzer Prize is just setting in. Gander, 63, has been writing poetry since he was a teenager. He appreciates the recognition of his work, and the fact that it will find a wider audience now.
    Follow this link to Gander's website, and a list of all his books.
    Forrest Gander and SM 1200
    (Image: Forrest Gander and KRCB News Director Steve Mencher. Credit: Adia White)
  • RivertownRevival 2 jpgHeritage, High-jinks and A Hootenanny
    July 20th, 2019 - 11am to 8pm

    Friends of the Petaluma River bring you the 10th Annual Rivertown Revival! NorCal Public Media is proud to be a media sponsor of this event.

    Celebrate Petaluma, community and the mighty Petaluma River. There will be live music, activities on the water, delicious local food and drink, a Curioddities Tent filled with breathtaking creatures, creative Sonoma County vendors, a large Play Area for kids and kids at heart, interactive art and more.
    Every year we are dedicated to creating an unforgettable and eco-friendly event decorated with re-used, re-cycled and re-purposed materials as much as possible. 
    Please join the fun dressed as yourself or any zany, odd, beautiful, ugly or avant-garde character you see fit. Your presence and undeniable creativity add to our event.

    RivertownRivival
  •   The 2014 Global Harmony Season of Offerings culminates with a week-long Days of Sakha Culture Festival on the Mendonoma coast with activities at Gualala Arts Center, Fort Ross State

  • Library photo for website
     
     

    Paying your library fines might not seem like a big deal. It usually adds up to spare change. But earlier this month, the Sonoma County Library decided to remove that burden from its patrons in the name of fairness. 

    Rushing quietly into the Sonoma County Library, a mother heaves a bag filled with children’s books onto the returns desk. 

    She may not know it, but she won’t be penalized if the books are overdue. The library has decided that fines are a financial burden and prevent patrons from borrowing more materials. 

    Ann Hammond, Sonoma County Library director, says it’s a social equity issue. “In our research, we found that about 30 percent of our library patrons, or approximately 42,000 people in this county, were blocked from using their library. And that’s because they had a minimum of $10 of overdue fines. $10, if it’s 25 cents per day per item and you’ve, you know, got several children who check out two dozen books each, you could rack up $10 in fines in no time at all.” 

    The Sonoma County Library follows in the steps of a number of libraries across the country, particularly in California, by eliminating all library fines. The only fee library goers are charged from now on is for the replacement of an item that’s lost or damaged. If a lost book isn’t returned within 62 days of its due date, the library patron will be charged for the cost of the book. But for those who end up finding that lost book under a couch cushion or car seat, the late fee will be removed. 

    “Oh, I think it’s going to bring in more customers,” says library goer Sarah Hazen. “There’s always of course the worry that people will not bring books back. But it’s a kind of generous, open-hearted way of operating, so I like it.”

    The revenue accrued by the library from fines was $200,000 per year. But this is only about one percent of the library’s total operating revenue, which Hammond says isn’t anything they can’t absorb. In fact, she says it was costing the library more in staff time to process the fines than they were getting back in revenue. According to Hammond, this new policy also relieves some stress from staff and creates a happier environment for both staff and patrons.  

    “Oh I think it’s a disaster,” says library goer George Shalimoff. “I can’t find circulating books sometimes, I can only find the reference books. And if I can find them circulating, they’re usually out. But the library should be the greatest function of any city or town.” 

    Hammond responds to this concern that without fines, people won’t return their books. “The research has shown that charging library fines does not really encourage people to bring back items on time. If they’re going to bring it back on time, they’re going to bring it back on time. What it really does effectively is punish people for the simple mistake of not returning an item on time. And that punishment is unfairly distributed.” 

    Children misplace books, parents don’t have time in their busy workday to return a book by its due date, people are traveling or have economic or personal issues that prevent them from paying library fines.

    So far, says Hammond, the response to the new policy has been overwhelmingly positive.

     

    Visit the website of the Sonoma County Library.

    See a list of the Sonoma County Library’s locations.

    Read about other local libraries that have adopted a no-fine system:

     
  • Screenshot 2019 05 23 2019 Sonoma County Pride Parade Information Sonoma County LGBT PrideSonoma County Pride is dedicated to enhancing the lives and well being of our Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex (LGBTQI) community and allies throughout Sonoma County. Pride promotes equality for all through education and activism, while serving as a liaison with government, businesses and other organizations on behalf of our community. NorCal Public Media is proud to be a media sponsor of this year's Sonoma County Pride festivities. Find out more at: https://www.sonomacountypride.org/
  • VolkerGuitarist Volker Strifler cannot imagine what it would be like for a musician to lose all of their instruments in a natural disaster. Instruments become a part of the musician. This inspired him to collaborate on the benefit music CD “Out of the Fire.” He believes we need to focus on the spirit as well as the physical aspects of fire recovery.

    Listen:

  • EkiMusician Eki Shola and her family narrowly escaped the North Bay Wildfires. Shola lost her home, instruments, and creative archive of music. She perseveres by creating new music that expresses her new appreciation for life. Music is a family affair with Eki Shola, her father has created new percussion sounds using found objects from the wreckage of the fire.

    Listen:

  • AdamFound object artist Adam Shaw and his family survived the North Bay Wildfires fighting back the flames around their Sonoma Valley home. The objects he has collected and curated are used within his evocative works of art to express the damage that trauma can inflict, and also the hope that it can inspire.
     
    Listen:
  • MarkMark “Mooka” Rennick, the owner of Prairie Sun Recording Studios, produced and performed on a benefit CD called “Out of the Fire.” The proceeds will go to replace the instruments musicians and music students lost in the fire.

    Listen:

  • MartinMartin Zuniga is a sculptor and painter. His home was surrounded by fire in October 2017. Through a mentorship and teaching project with youth, Zuniga created a mural project that reflects themes of endurance, survival, and endurance.
     
    Listen:
  •  
    KimberlyNew media artists Kimberly Koym-Murteira is preserving memories of the North Bay Wildfires through the unique medium of glass storage jars that project video footage. Koym-Murteira views this capture and display technique as a way to store and share memories that have shaped our community.
     
    Listen:
  • KRCB North Bay Public Media explores the importance of arts education in in K-12 education, with a community grant from Sonoma Wine Country Weekend. View the videos on this page to learn more.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  • About the National Endowment for the Arts

    The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $4 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector.

  • Conservative critics are attacking a production of William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” that’s running in New York. The basics of the play are the same as they’ve been since 1599 — the title character is deemed “ambitious” and is murdered in the Roman Senate on the Ides of March.

  • President Trump's proposed budget calls for big cuts in a wide array of domestic programs — among them, agencies that fund the arts, humanities and public media.

    Funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting would be cut to zero under the proposal, and the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities would be eliminated entirely, the first time any president has proposed such a measure.

  • The Santa Rosa Symphony continues its series of very public job interviews. This past weekend, Graeme Jenkins conducted the orchestra in performances of music by Haydn and Bartok, with pianist Orli Shaham joining the group in Mozart's Concert No.

    21 in C major for Piano and Orchestra. Attendees received an email Tuesday asking them to rate the conductor's skills and rapport with the audience. He'll be compared to the previous three candidates, and the upcoming guest conductor Michael Christie, who arrives in February for a weekend.

    Jenkins had the audience's attention immediately, as he dove into Haydn's Symphony No. 100 in G major. He drew warm, precise playing from the strings and seemed to enjoy the band's martial percussion flourishes in the second movement Allegretto. (The symphony is nicknamed "Military.")

    The Mozart concerto showed Jenkins as a steady and inspired musical partner to Shaham, whose brother, violinist Gil Shaham, is perhaps a little better known. Her reputation as a Mozart specialist was on display as her crystaline and lucid touch drew a very Classical sound from the modern concert grand onstage. Mozart requires enormous precision, but that detailed playing shouldn't be at the expense of warmth. Shaham has all those bases covered and earned an enthusiastic standing ovation from the crowd.

    After intermission, Graeme shifted to the role of music educator. He spoke engagingly about the themes of the Bartok Concerto for Orchestra, illustrating each passage musically, calling the soloists by name, and generally giving the audience a sense that if he is hired to lead the band, he'd be an approachable and informal "maestro" without any fuss or pretension.

    Although the concert I attended took place on Martin Luther King's birthday holiday, the only nod to the occasion was a statement by Jenkins that "he has a dream" for the orchestra's excellence in "world class" Weill Hall at the Green Music Center. It wasn't exactly a false note, but it emphasized the apparent lack of diversity in the orchestra and the audience. These are issues that any new conductor will undoubtedly address in time.

    The actual performance of the Bartok delivered on Jenkins' promise. It was an intelligent and emotional ride through the composer's late in life homage to his native Hungary. The audience once again awarded a standing ovation, and made it clear that Jenkins is a strong contender for the important job of leading Santa Rosa's orchestra into its next chapter.

    ---

    Steve Mencher was a radio producer at Carnegie Hall and worked for NPR'sPerformance Today music program. He's currently news director of KRCB.

    Original Source

  • Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

    Transcript

    MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

    As we just heard, it is not easy being an artist. A lot of art history majors, in fact, make self-deprecating jokes about just how much their degrees are worth.

  • In September, WGBH traveled a few hours west on the Mass Pike to capture Brooklyn-based Big Thief performing live at Gateway City Arts in Holyoke, Mass.

    Guitarist Buck Meek was not able to make the show, so the band's set took on a particularly intimate vibe interspersed with moments of full-volume energy.

  • CaraBlackSunday at 4 pm on KRCB FM Radio 91.Word by Word listeners (and mystery writers) will enjoy the conversation (and pick up a few writing tips), during Gil Mansergh’s informative conversation with Cara Black, the New York Times bestselling author of 19 Aimee Leduc murder mysteries. Each novel takes place in a different Parisian administrative district. Known as arrondissements, these 22 districts circle outward in a clockwise spiral from the center of Paris. Cara’s newest novel takes place in the 12th district, and we learn how this specific locale prompted her latest mystery, Murder in Bel Air.

  • Arts News

    • Library photo for website
      July 18, 2019

      Sonoma County Library Eliminates Overdue Fines

      Paying your library fines might not seem like a big deal. It usually adds up to spare change. But earlier this month, the Sonoma County Library decided to remove that burden from its patrons in the name of fairness. Rushing quietly into the Sonoma County Library, a mother heaves a bag filled with…
    • July 09, 2019

      Rivertown Revival

      Heritage, High-jinks and A HootenannyJuly 20th, 2019 - 11am to 8pm Friends of the Petaluma River bring you the 10th Annual Rivertown Revival! NorCal Public Media is proud to be a media sponsor of this event. Celebrate Petaluma, community and the mighty Petaluma River. There will be live music,…
    • Hairspray at BAM 2019 26
      July 09, 2019

      'Hairspray': The Perfect Musical for this Moment

      It’s a time capsule of a time capsule, looking back to the 1988 John Waters film, the 2002 Tony-winning Broadway musical and the 2007 film starring John Travolta. So why does Hairspray seem so fresh and of the moment in its summer 2019 San Francisco incarnation? Maybe it’s the lineage of the…
    • exiled cover
      July 03, 2019

      Book Tells Stories of Refugees Exiled 'Home' to Cambodia

      Exiled is author Katya Cengel’s recent book about Cambodian refugees in California. In the light of current refugee policies, it’s instructive to learn about how some of these residents face deportation and uncertainty if they run afoul of U.S. law. Hovering in the background of the story: the…
    • IMG 0934
      June 19, 2019

      KRCB Wins Three Awards from the Public Radio Journalists Association

      Sarah Bohannon and Steve Mencher accept the award for "Letter from Santa Rosa."NorCal Public Media won three national journalism awards for projects produced in 2018. KRCB News Director Steve Mencher accepted the awards at The Public Radio Journalists Association conference in Washington D.C. on…
    • Martin
      June 11, 2019

      Stories from the Fire: Passion for Survival

      Martin Zuniga is a sculptor and painter. His home was surrounded by fire in October 2017. Through a mentorship and teaching project with youth, Zuniga created a mural project that reflects themes of endurance, survival, and endurance. Listen:
    • Jun 07, 2019

      Word by Word Welcomes Murder Mystery Writer Cara Black

      Sunday at 4 pm on KRCB FM Radio 91.Word by Word listeners (and mystery writers) will enjoy the conversation (and pick up a few writing tips), during…
    • Oakland Temple resize
      May 21, 2019

      Mormon Temple in Oakland Open to Public for Limited Time

      The iconic Mormon temple visible from Highway 13 in Oakland is open to the public for a limited time through early June. According to the website of…
    • Mark
      May 03, 2019

      Stories from the Fire: Out of the Fire

      Mark “Mooka” Rennick, the owner of Prairie Sun Recording Studios, produced and performed on a benefit CD called “Out of the Fire.” The proceeds will…
    • forrest gander website
      May 01, 2019

      Pulitzer Prize-winning Poet: 'I Love Petaluma'

      Forrest Gander is the winner of this year's Pulitzer Prize for Poetry. He was born in California, has lived in Mexico, and taught at Brown University…
    • Rob photo
      Apr 26, 2019

      Political Cartoonist Speaks on the Importance of Satire

      Political cartoonist Rob Rogers was fired from his job at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette last year after being told to stop drawing unflattering…
    • Eki
      Apr 24, 2019

      Stories from the Fire: Marching On

      Musician Eki Shola and her family narrowly escaped the North Bay Wildfires. Shola lost her home, instruments, and creative archive of music. She…
    • InvisibleBars WEB 1
      Apr 03, 2019

      New Doc, Invisible Bars, Touts Family Ties for Prisoners

      On April 15, KRCB TV 22 will present Invisible Bars, about new California programs that take into account the damage done to families in the age of…
    • Kimberly
      Apr 02, 2019

      Stories from the Fire: Preserving Memories

      New media artists Kimberly Koym-Murteira is preserving memories of the North Bay Wildfires through the unique medium of glass storage jars that…
    • Screenshot 2019 05 23 2019 Sonoma County Pride Parade Information Sonoma County LGBT Pride
      Apr 01, 2019

      Sonoma County Pride 2019

      Sonoma County Pride is dedicated to enhancing the lives and well being of our Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex (LGBTQI) community…
    • NeighborVertical
      Mar 19, 2019

      Free Community Screenings

      Join us for a free screening of these important public television documentary programs. Meet staff members from NorCal Public Media at our…
    • fiorello thomson crop
      Mar 08, 2019

      Musical from Broadway's Golden Age, Fiorello!, Is Up to Date

      San Francisco's 42nd Street Moon theater company is revisiting a golden age classic this month. Fiorello! tells the story of an Italian lawyer, then…
    • greg sarris supplied hi res crop
      Mar 06, 2019

      Greg Sarris: Author, Professor, Chairman of Local Tribe

      This week brings the paperback release of a story collection from writer and teacher Greg Sarris. You may know Sarris from his other job – Chairman…

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