Seismologist Lucy Jones talks during a news conference at the Caltech Seismological Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., on Thursday. A strong earthquake rattled

a large swath of Southern California and parts of Nevada on Thursday morning. John Antczak/AP hide caption

toggle caption John Antczak/AP

Seismologist Lucy Jones talks during a news conference at the Caltech Seismological Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., on Thursday. A strong earthquake rattled a large swath of Southern California and parts of Nevada on Thursday morning.

John Antczak/AP

A strong 6.4 magnitude earthquake struck Southern California on Thursday centered in a remote desert area some 150 miles northeast of Los Angeles, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Emergency officials in Kern County, Calif., have responded to nearly two dozen incidents including people needing medical assistance and structure fires around the city of Ridgecrest, where a regional hospital also had to be evacuated, according to county officials.

Officials did not immediately report any deaths or major injuries in connection with the earthquake.

People on social media shared videos of homes and stores shaking as far apart as Los Angeles and Las Vegas, Nev.

#earthquake#losangeles did anyone else feel it?!? pic.twitter.com/CvVxBJwBvL

— Faby (@lovelyfabyy) July 4, 2019

But LA Mayor Eric Garcetti said the city experienced "no significant damage."

In Ridgecrest, near the center of the quake, Mayor Peggy Breedon said fires have broken out, gas lines have been damaged and debris has fallen off some buildings around the city.

My dads liquor store in Ridgecrest (11 miles from the earthquake) ? pic.twitter.com/4RC0mY3eha

— Zomo (@zomo_abd) July 4, 2019

"We are used to earthquakes but we're not used to this significance," Breedon told MSNBC.

Breedon asked residents to look out for each other as aftershocks continue, especially for the elderly, who make up a large portion of Ridgecrest's population.

More aftershocks, even another large quake, could occur in the coming days, according to seismologist Lucy Jones at the California Institute of Technology.

The quake was the largest in Southern California since 1999, Jones said.

President Trump tweeted that he had been briefed and "all seems to be very much under control!"

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